It’s illegal for Uber workers to strike. Marshall Steinbaum explains why.

“You can get employer monopsony power without the out-and-out control of an entire labor market by a single employer.” – Marshall Steinbaum, Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Utah

“Set the market and work when and how you like. You have complete control.” At least that is what gig economy companies like Uber would have you believe. In this episode of Innovation For All Podcast, Sheana speaks with Marshall Steinbaum, Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Utah, to talk about the pitfalls of the gig economy. Find out how employers can have control over the workforce without being a monopoly and how gig workers may be getting the short end of the stick. 

You’ll learn: 

  • Why did Uber driver’s strike?
  • What makes the gig economy examples more complex?
  • What is the difference between the gig economy labor and employment relationships? 
  • What should an independent contractor relationship look like?
  • Who is an independent contractor?
  • What are the markers of employer and employee relationships as opposed to independent contractor relationship.
  • How does antitrust factor in to these issues?
  • Proposed solutions to the gig economy and labor laws
  • How these companies exercise control over their workers
  • Good news about the gig economy

Mentions and Links:

More About Marshall

Marshall Steinbaum is a Research Director and a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute where he researches market power and inequality. He has worked for the Center for Equitable Growth and had a Ph.D from the University of Chicago. He has written an SSRN anti-trust gig economy and labor article and appears the book The President’s House is Empty: Losing and Gaining Public Goods.

Connect with Marshall:

Twitter

What’s in those terms of service we agree to? Featuring Nate Beard

“What are the rules around the development and implementation of these technologies? And what does that mean for the future of technological development?”
— Nate Beard, PhD candidate at UMD, College Park

What’s really in online terms of service that we agree to? Nate Beard joins Sheana to talk about where these terms of service come from and what’s in them. Find out what rights we may be sacrificing while using social media platforms in this episode of the Innovation For All Podcast.

In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What’s in Terms of Service and do we really understand them?
  • Problems that come with terms of service on social media
  • Ethics of Terms of Service
  • How restrictive are terms of service?
  • What rights are affected by TOS?
  • Speech on social media platforms
  • Privacy,  ownership, and due process on social media platforms
  • Ways forward with Terms of Service

Links and People Mentioned

Other Resources from Nate

Terms of Service General info:

IP/copyright:

Other Resources:

Connect with Nate

Twitter

The hiring process wasn’t built for women. Katharine Zaleski of PowerToFly is changing that.

“When you’re recruiting women, you need to start a dialogue with the group of women you want to bring in and recruit. And it’s a long conversation.” — Katharine Zaleski, President of PowerToFly

How can we build a more inclusive and productive workforce? In this episode of the Innovation For All podcast, Sheana speaks with Katherine Zaleski, one of the founders of Power To Fly. Katherine shares how PowerToFly is completely reinventing the traditional hiring process to companies bring more women into the workplace and become more inclusive.

In this episode you will learn:

  • What is wrong with traditional work?
  • What it the mission of Power To Fly?
  • How is Power to Fly addressing the gender pipeline problem?
  • How can remote work play a key role in hiring women?

Links

What does human-centered AI even mean? A very meta conversation with Josh Lovejoy.

“When a system begins to remember us forever, and wherever we go…. we will not be our true selves. We will be the self we know it’s okay to remember.”
— Josh Lovejoy, Principal design manager, ethics and society at Microsoft.

AI and Machine Learning systems are quickly becoming an integral part of how we work with, understand, and socialize with each other. Although this new technology is extremely exciting and offers a new wave of technological advancement, with it comes many ethical issues concerning discrimination, undermining human emotion, breaking social contracts and more.

Sheana Ahlqvist talks to Josh Lovejoy, Principal Design Manager at Microsoft, specializing in the Ethics and Society sector. Josh believes that human-centered design thinking can change the world for the better; that by seeking to address the needs of people- especially those at the margins- in ways that respect, restore and augment their capabilities, we can invent forms of technological innovation that would have otherwise been invisible.

IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL HEAR:

  • Why do corporations want to know what people are thinking and feeling?
  • Forming trust relationships using AI systems.
  • What is a design ethicist?
  • What kinds of things can impartial AI autonomous systems do better than humans.
  • How do autonomous AI systems take advantage of consumers?
  • What is predictive policing and how does it relate to AI ethics?
  • What are some examples of misapplications of Machine Learning systems.
  • What is a deepfake?
  • What is a mean opinion score and how does it apply to voice automation?
  • Josh’s opinion on how AI tools should be developed.
  • What happens when you give up personal data in exchange for a more personalized experience?
  • Who should have the authority to make consequential decisions about AI?
  • How will AI and Machine Learning systems shape our knowledge and create change for the future?
  • How do you create machine learning systems that are unbiased but still function effectively for the user?

LINKS:

OTHERS MENTIONED:

  • Youtube
  • Spotify
  • AI
  • Machine-Learning Algorithms
  • Predictive Policing
  • Google
  • Reddit
  • Terminator
  • Deepfake
  • Eric Horvitz
  • Microsoft Research
  • Google Duplex
  • Brad Smith
  • Wavenet
  • Deep Mind
  • Adobe
  • Mean Opinion Score
  • Moritz Hart
  • Kate Crawford
  • Stanford
  • Star Trek
  • Facebook
  • Meredith Whittaker
  • AI Now
  • Nick Bostrom
  • Super Intelligence
  • Joy Buolamwini
  • Google Clips

CONNECT WITH JOSH

Making Products Inclusive, the Google Way featuring Reena Jana


“There is mounting evidence that when you accelerate inclusion you accelerate growth and market opportunity.” — Reena Jana, Google’s Head of Product and Business Inclusion

How does Google make successful products when their users are infinitely diverse? Head of Product and Business Inclusion at Google, Reena Jana, shares in this episode the ways that this tech giant takes an inclusive approach to serve its users and be sensitive to different cultural norms. Reena shares how some of Google’s best products were modified and improved through inclusive design and research practices. She describes the innovative AI technology that Google is using to help with product inclusion and make the products better for everyone who uses them. She also shares with Sheana some of the challenges they’ve faced along the way.

In this episode you will learn:

  • What is product inclusion?
  • Best practices to overcome product inclusion challenges
  • The benefits and challenges of handling inclusion on a global scale
  • How Reena forged her role as the head of product and business inclusion
  • Product Inclusion success stories and how the team develops these products
  • How machine learning in helping Product Inclusion
  • How the product development process prioritizes diversity at each level
  • Why inclusivity is valuable
  • Free tools Google offers to help product inclusion outside of their organization

Links and people mentioned