How Meal Delivery Apps are Killing Your Favorite Restaurants featuring Chris Webb, CEO of ChowNow

Food delivery apps like UberEats are putting mom and pop restaurants out of business. In final episode of Season 1 of the Innovation For All podcast, Chris Webb, CEO of ChowNow, shows the actual cost of meal delivery and how ChowNow is trying to mitigate those risks through an alternative business model.

You’ll learn:

  • How much food marketplaces charge the host restaurant, on top of the fees they charge the customer
  • How his experience at Lehman Brothers in 2008 shapes his current skepticism
  • Why ordering direct from the retailer should always be the consumer’s first option
  • Does the restaurant know who is buying their food when ordered through a delivery app?
  • Why are restaurants willing to use delivery apps even when they are unprofitable?
  • What does a model that puts the restaurant first look like?

Chris has always had an affinity for small and independently owned restaurants. His love of these small businesses and his own family’s small step into the food retail space revealed a passion at the intersection of food and technology.

ChowNow is the leading online ordering and marketing platform for local restaurants. Founded in 2011, ChowNow currently works with 11,000 restaurants nationwide – making it easy for customers to order directly from their websites, ChowNow-built branded mobile apps and third-party websites including Google, Yelp, and Instagram.

Prior to ChowNow, Chris was a founding investor in healthy, fast-casual chain Tender Greens. Chris’ involvement in Tender Greens fueled his mission to put smaller independent restaurants on a level playing field with the national chains when it came to technology solutions, tools, and apps.

Connect with Chris Webb & ChowNow:

Others Mentioned:

Stay Tuned for Season 2!

Innovation For All will be returning for Season 2 in May 2019. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcasting platform to listen to great episodes in Season 1 and get alerted as soon as Season 2 begins.

From Homeless to Fashion Tech Entrepreneur: Cassie Betts

Cassie Betts is the founder of District2.Co, a technology company that connects brands/designers with factories to streamline the manufacturing process, and Made In South LA (MISLA), a DevShop Academy. In this episode of the Innovation For All Podcast, learn how Cassie went from being homeless to being called “The Woman Turning South LA into Startup Land” by Forbes.

You’ll learn:

  • How Cassie Betts started her entrepreneurship and coding interests in her youth.
  • Battling Sexism and Racism in the technology industry.
  • Leveraging past experiences and using them for success.
  • What District2 is and its mission.
  • The current state of the fashion industry with regards to innovative technology.
  • How the District2 platform has streamlined the fashion industry process.
  • Challenges faced by the fashion industry with manufacturers.
  • What is Made in South LA (MISLA).
  • How MISLA is trying to change the current economic situation by offering training to high paying tech jobs.
  • Problems of underrepresented minorities in the technology industry and possible solutions.
  • Training approach to help the ill effects of gentrification in communities.

Mentioned:

Connect with Cassie and MISLA:

What would ethical data practices look like? Featuring Amanda McGlothlin

“Tech should be built for good” says Amanda McGlothlin, co-founder and Chief Design Officer at HQ Network, a Los Angeles space start-up providing digital security products and services for individuals and businesses. As a leader in tech, Amanda believes that privacy is a fundamental human right. Hear her tactical, realistic approach to product design that truly protects the user’s privacy.


IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:

  • How VPNs secure your information and prevent unwanted information getting to your devices.
  • How ads and third party tracker are not only annoying, but cost us money and make our technology less valuable.
  • The future of an ad-free user experience.
  • The use of ad-blockers and whether they are as effective as we think.
  • The new privacy laws that protect consumers from data breaches.
  • How companies can exercise more responsibility around their data practices to both protect the user and create success for their business.
  • What product managers and coders can do to support these companies who are willing to change their data practices for good.
  • What dark patterns are and how they apply to data and tracking.
  • Why it’s possible to collect data in moderation and still experience the benefits of analytics.
  • HQ Network’s view of data collecting and their ethical approach to their data practices.
  • A recent Facebook scandal and how it relates to user research.
  • How consumers can protect their data and exercise safety while online.
  • Facebook, as an example of a company that uses less than perfect data practices.

LINKS:

OTHERS MENTIONED:

  • VPN
  • GDPR
  • Facebook
  • iTunes
  • Apple
  • Sally Hubbard
  • Google Analytics
  • Cookies
  • Javascript
  • Stripe
  • App Store
  • Google
  • Enterprise Certificate
  • Instagram
  • WhatsApp
  • Troy Hunt
  • Katharine Hargreaves
  • ARKO
  • Stuart Turner

If you enjoy this episode, you might enjoy my conversation with Sally Hubbard: Google and Facebook are Monopolies: Does it matter?

What did you change your mind about in 2018? Answers on AI, data, work, and more.

In this special episode, our favorite experts on AI, tech monopolies, and more return to answer two key questions: What is something you’ve changed your mind about in 2018? And what is something you’d like to see become a larger part of the conversation in 2019?

You don’t want to miss this one. Want to hear more from these great guests? Check out their full episodes:

Is Netflix a Tech Company or a Media Company? Dr. Amanda Lotz explains why it matters.

Have you ever considered that big tech is not one monopoly but… five monopolies instead? That Netflix, Google, Facebook and Airbnb are not part of a disrupting ‘tech industry’ but… companies that are simply using tech to disrupt their own industries?

In this episode of the Innovation For All Podcast, Sheana Ahlqvist talks to Amanda Lotz, an author, podcaster and professor in the media industry. They discuss why big tech is not actually a monopoly, the different business models these tech companies implement, and how we should encourage these companies to be more transparent.

IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL HEAR:

● Is big tech really a monopoly?
● Is the big tech monolith a force for good or bad?
● Why are these companies not actual competitors?
● Why is it more beneficial for these companies to compete against each other?
● What are the benefits of monopolisation?
● How should we deal with a company like Google?
● What are the differences between Netflix and Disney?
● How can we define a media industry?
● Is Netflix a media company?
● How can we encourage companies to be more transparent?

Sheana and Amanda also talk about the actual business model of these huge tech companies. Google primarily relies on advertising. Their trick – you get the ads for what you were already searching for. Apple mostly makes money from selling products. Amazon also sells products, but they focus on subscription based income through Amazon Prime. This is actually very different to Netflix, which Amanda explains is an actual media company that has completely disrupted the industry. How? Because Netflix produces and distributes at the same time. Netflix also has a huge amount of data on its users, allowing them to tailor their movies to a user’s specific preferences.

Comparing these business models is fascinating and very interesting to analyse – we see why monopolies can actually be a force for good, what we can expect from them in the future, and why the number one thing they need to focus on is transparency.

LINKS

OTHERS MENTIONED

CONNECT WITH AMANDA