How can technology help close early education gaps? feat. Cyrena Chih

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Today on the Innovation For All Podcast, Sheana chats with Cyrena Chih, formerly the Director of Product & Business Development for Khan Academy Kids. Learn in this episode how digital educational resources can support kindergarten readiness.

Khan Academy Kids is a free app, available on iOS and Android, that offers early-learning development activities for two- to six-year-old kids. It features engaging activities that develop not only the literacy and math skills of the child but also social-cognitive skills. Cyrena discusses the product and business choices they’ve made to ensure their product reaches more low-income children and families. She also describes how to tell whether an “educational” app is really designed with kids in mind.

YOU’LL LEARN:

  • How to design kid-friendly applications
  • What a well-executed adaptive learning program looks like
  • Why they choose to turn from a for-profit to a non-profit
  • How do we choose technology to alleviate early achievement gaps?
  • The importance of parents co-playing with their kids.

LINKS

Others Mentioned

CONNECT WITH CYRENA

On Twitter – @cyrenachih

Why FinTech is failing the poor with Wendy De La Rosa

How can FinTech leverage behavioral economics to help people become more financially secure? Sheana Ahlqvist talks to Wendy De La Rosa, co-founder of Common Cents Lab, a research lab that launches and tests products to help low-to-moderate-income Americans.

IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL HEAR:

  • What kinds of Fintech products and apps effectively help people budget and save.
  • How certain Fintech apps could be hurting more than helping those below the poverty line.
  • Why lots of common features are ineffective and undermine our interest in savings.
  • Tricks from behavioural economics that anyone can use to get their spending habits in order.
  • How the needs of those in poverty are drastically different and what product managers can do to fit their unique needs.
  • Specific ways to remove friction around SNAP benefits, tax refunds and loan repayments to help people in poverty get ahead.
  • Frequency Budgets vs. Financial Budgets
  • What dark patterns are and how they apply to Fintech products.
  • How “round-ups” can help people save money in the long term.
  • How temptation plays a major role in how people deal with their money.

Sheana and Wendy also talk about Wendy’s course: Designing AI to Cultivate Human Well Being.

LINKS:

OTHERS MENTIONED:

  • Tech Crunch
  • Forbes
  • 30 Under 30 Forbes
  • PBS News
  • MetLife Foundation
  • Uber
  • Lyft
  • SNAP Benefits
  • Ford
  • Amanda McLaughlin
  • Jennifer Aaker
  • Fei Fei Li
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Stanford University

Stereotyping Appalachia: What Tech Gets Wrong feat. Dr. Sherry Hamby

In this episode of the Innovation For All Podcast, Sheana Ahlqvist talks to Dr. Sherry Hamby, a Research Professor of Psychology at the University of the South and a Director of the Life Paths Research Center (LPRC). They talk about the role of technology in peoples daily lives. They discuss Appalachian attitudes and values, ResilienceCon and how different societies operate in a technology-centric environment.

IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL HEAR:

  • The culture of values and skepticism that makes Appalachian resistant to technology
  • What are the attitudes and stereotypes about Appalachia?
  • How are low income regions like Appalachia portrayed?
  • How different forms of violence are shifting online, for instance Cyber bullying
  • The negative effects on relationships from technology
  • How do people feel about Privacy invasion, data protection and cyber-crimes?
  • Is protecting our own privacy equally distributed among the rich and the poor?
  • What are the differences between how rural and urban societies operate?
  • How do regulations fit in all this?
  • The importance of consent in letting technology earn the trust of people.

Sheana and Sherry also talk about ResilienceCon.

LINKS

OTHERS MENTIONED

  • Orange is the New Black
  • The Simpsons
  • Yelp
  • Amazon
  • GDPR
  • Apple
  • Facebook
  • TED Talks
  • Jeff Temple
  • Emily Rothman

CONNECT WITH SHERRY

What did you change your mind about in 2018? Answers on AI, data, work, and more.

In this special episode, our favorite experts on AI, tech monopolies, and more return to answer two key questions: What is something you’ve changed your mind about in 2018? And what is something you’d like to see become a larger part of the conversation in 2019?

You don’t want to miss this one. Want to hear more from these great guests? Check out their full episodes:

Is Netflix a Tech Company or a Media Company? Dr. Amanda Lotz explains why it matters.

Have you ever considered that big tech is not one monopoly but… five monopolies instead? That Netflix, Google, Facebook and Airbnb are not part of a disrupting ‘tech industry’ but… companies that are simply using tech to disrupt their own industries?

In this episode of the Innovation For All Podcast, Sheana Ahlqvist talks to Amanda Lotz, an author, podcaster and professor in the media industry. They discuss why big tech is not actually a monopoly, the different business models these tech companies implement, and how we should encourage these companies to be more transparent.

IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL HEAR:

● Is big tech really a monopoly?
● Is the big tech monolith a force for good or bad?
● Why are these companies not actual competitors?
● Why is it more beneficial for these companies to compete against each other?
● What are the benefits of monopolisation?
● How should we deal with a company like Google?
● What are the differences between Netflix and Disney?
● How can we define a media industry?
● Is Netflix a media company?
● How can we encourage companies to be more transparent?

Sheana and Amanda also talk about the actual business model of these huge tech companies. Google primarily relies on advertising. Their trick – you get the ads for what you were already searching for. Apple mostly makes money from selling products. Amazon also sells products, but they focus on subscription based income through Amazon Prime. This is actually very different to Netflix, which Amanda explains is an actual media company that has completely disrupted the industry. How? Because Netflix produces and distributes at the same time. Netflix also has a huge amount of data on its users, allowing them to tailor their movies to a user’s specific preferences.

Comparing these business models is fascinating and very interesting to analyse – we see why monopolies can actually be a force for good, what we can expect from them in the future, and why the number one thing they need to focus on is transparency.

LINKS

OTHERS MENTIONED

CONNECT WITH AMANDA