What’s in those terms of service we agree to? Featuring Nate Beard

“What are the rules around the development and implementation of these technologies? And what does that mean for the future of technological development?”
— Nate Beard, PhD candidate at UMD, College Park

What’s really in online terms of service that we agree to? Nate Beard joins Sheana to talk about where these terms of service come from and what’s in them. Find out what rights we may be sacrificing while using social media platforms in this episode of the Innovation For All Podcast.

In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What’s in Terms of Service and do we really understand them?
  • Problems that come with terms of service on social media
  • Ethics of Terms of Service
  • How restrictive are terms of service?
  • What rights are affected by TOS?
  • Speech on social media platforms
  • Privacy,  ownership, and due process on social media platforms
  • Ways forward with Terms of Service

Links and People Mentioned

Other Resources from Nate

Terms of Service General info:

IP/copyright:

Other Resources:

Connect with Nate

Twitter

The hiring process wasn’t built for women. Katharine Zaleski of PowerToFly is changing that.

“When you’re recruiting women, you need to start a dialogue with the group of women you want to bring in and recruit. And it’s a long conversation.” — Katharine Zaleski, President of PowerToFly

How can we build a more inclusive and productive workforce? In this episode of the Innovation For All podcast, Sheana speaks with Katherine Zaleski, one of the founders of Power To Fly. Katherine shares how PowerToFly is completely reinventing the traditional hiring process to companies bring more women into the workplace and become more inclusive.

In this episode you will learn:

  • What is wrong with traditional work?
  • What it the mission of Power To Fly?
  • How is Power to Fly addressing the gender pipeline problem?
  • How can remote work play a key role in hiring women?

Links

How Meal Delivery Apps are Killing Your Favorite Restaurants featuring Chris Webb, CEO of ChowNow

Food delivery apps like UberEats are putting mom and pop restaurants out of business. In final episode of Season 1 of the Innovation For All podcast, Chris Webb, CEO of ChowNow, shows the actual cost of meal delivery and how ChowNow is trying to mitigate those risks through an alternative business model.

You’ll learn:

  • How much food marketplaces charge the host restaurant, on top of the fees they charge the customer
  • How his experience at Lehman Brothers in 2008 shapes his current skepticism
  • Why ordering direct from the retailer should always be the consumer’s first option
  • Does the restaurant know who is buying their food when ordered through a delivery app?
  • Why are restaurants willing to use delivery apps even when they are unprofitable?
  • What does a model that puts the restaurant first look like?

Chris has always had an affinity for small and independently owned restaurants. His love of these small businesses and his own family’s small step into the food retail space revealed a passion at the intersection of food and technology.

ChowNow is the leading online ordering and marketing platform for local restaurants. Founded in 2011, ChowNow currently works with 11,000 restaurants nationwide – making it easy for customers to order directly from their websites, ChowNow-built branded mobile apps and third-party websites including Google, Yelp, and Instagram.

Prior to ChowNow, Chris was a founding investor in healthy, fast-casual chain Tender Greens. Chris’ involvement in Tender Greens fueled his mission to put smaller independent restaurants on a level playing field with the national chains when it came to technology solutions, tools, and apps.

Connect with Chris Webb & ChowNow:

Others Mentioned:

Stay Tuned for Season 2!

Innovation For All will be returning for Season 2 in May 2019. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcasting platform to listen to great episodes in Season 1 and get alerted as soon as Season 2 begins.

What would ethical data practices look like? Featuring Amanda McGlothlin

“Tech should be built for good” says Amanda McGlothlin, co-founder and Chief Design Officer at HQ Network, a Los Angeles space start-up providing digital security products and services for individuals and businesses. As a leader in tech, Amanda believes that privacy is a fundamental human right. Hear her tactical, realistic approach to product design that truly protects the user’s privacy.


IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL LEARN:

  • How VPNs secure your information and prevent unwanted information getting to your devices.
  • How ads and third party tracker are not only annoying, but cost us money and make our technology less valuable.
  • The future of an ad-free user experience.
  • The use of ad-blockers and whether they are as effective as we think.
  • The new privacy laws that protect consumers from data breaches.
  • How companies can exercise more responsibility around their data practices to both protect the user and create success for their business.
  • What product managers and coders can do to support these companies who are willing to change their data practices for good.
  • What dark patterns are and how they apply to data and tracking.
  • Why it’s possible to collect data in moderation and still experience the benefits of analytics.
  • HQ Network’s view of data collecting and their ethical approach to their data practices.
  • A recent Facebook scandal and how it relates to user research.
  • How consumers can protect their data and exercise safety while online.
  • Facebook, as an example of a company that uses less than perfect data practices.

LINKS:

OTHERS MENTIONED:

  • VPN
  • GDPR
  • Facebook
  • iTunes
  • Apple
  • Sally Hubbard
  • Google Analytics
  • Cookies
  • Javascript
  • Stripe
  • App Store
  • Google
  • Enterprise Certificate
  • Instagram
  • WhatsApp
  • Troy Hunt
  • Katharine Hargreaves
  • ARKO
  • Stuart Turner

If you enjoy this episode, you might enjoy my conversation with Sally Hubbard: Google and Facebook are Monopolies: Does it matter?